isis video date code

ISIS supporters went wild once al-Kasasbeh was captured on Dec. 24, celebrating and calling for the pilot’s execution. They launched a hashtag on Twitter that translated to “We All Want the Slaughter of Mu’ath,” and jihadists on social media brainstormed creative ways to kill him — from beheading to harvesting his organs to even shooting him out of a canon across the border into Jordan.

As early as Jan. 8, tweets suggested the pilot had met a fiery end.

“A group of ISIS members in #Raqqa are talking among them enthusiastically about the execution of Jordanian pilot…who was burned to death by #ISIS,” one activist account, @raqqa_mcr, tweeted.

An interview with al-Kasasbeh which appeared in ISIS’ Dabiq magazine — released on Dec. 30 — featured an image of the pilot in an orange jumpsuit and quotes about the U.S.-led coalition’s efforts. That same jumpsuit — and the same words — appeared in the video showing al-Kasasbeh’s purported murder.

This time, however, the words were on camera — al-Kasasbeh speaks from a table with a noticeable black eye. When he is shown from a cage before being set alight, he has the same black eye — which suggests the murder was filmed shortly after the interview.

“The fact that his black eye was still in a similar stage of bruising fairly clearly shows that he was killed shortly after when they released the interview,” according to Winter.

The MP4/MOV video files have the time codes embedded in the files, such time codes are stored in the video files when they are recorded. But the time codes are not visible when you view the MP4/MOV files. When you use video edit tools to convert the MP4/MOV files to other files, the time codes get lost. By using vMTS, the time codes are extracted from the MP4/MOV files and superimposed onto the videos. This way the date/time will be visible when you view the stamped file, consequently other files made out of the stamped files will have date/time displayed.

When videos recorded on an AVCHD camcorder are captured into AVCHD files on a PC, the time codes (date/time when the tape was recorded) are transferred along with the video/audio data to the files. But the time codes are not visible when you view the AVCHD files. When you use video edit tools (e.g. Windows Live Movie Maker) to convert the AVCHD files to other files, the time codes get lost. By using vATS, the time codes are extracted from the AVCHD files and superimposed onto the videos. This way the date/time will be visible when you view the stamped file, consequently other files made out of the stamped files will have date/time displayed.

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