The Gap of War Forecasting Past Tactics Still Exists

Summer 1990.

Iraq has moved troops to the Kuwait Border.

On September 11, 1990, Bush also told a joint session of Congress that “following negotiations and promises by Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein not to use force, a powerful army invaded its trusting and much weaker neighbor, Kuwait.

Within three days, 120,000 troops with 850 tanks had poured into Kuwait and moved south to threaten Saudi Arabia.

Satellite photographs taken by the Soviet Union on the precise day Bush addressed Congress failed to show any evidence of Iraqi troops in Kuwait or massing along the Kuwait-Saudi Arabian border.

While the Pentagon was claiming as many as 250,000 Iraqi troops in Kuwait, it refused to provide evidence that would contradict the Soviet satellite photos.

U.S. forces, encampments, aircraft, camouflaged equipment dumps, staging areas and tracks across the desert can easily be seen.

On September 18, 1991, only a week after the Soviet photos were taken, the Pentagon was telling the American public that Iraqi forces in Kuwait had grown to 360,000 men and 2,800 tanks.

But the photos of Kuwait do not show any tank tracks in southern Kuwait. They clearly do show tracks left by vehicles which serviced a large oil field, but no tank tracks. Heller concludes that as of January 6, 1991, the Pentagon had not provided the press or Congress with any proof at all for an early buildup of Iraqi troops in southern Kuwait that would suggest an imminent invasion of Saudi Arabia. The usual Pentagon evidence was little more than “trust me.”

But photos from Soviet commercial satellites tell quite a convincing story. Photos taken on August 8, 1990, of southern Kuwait – six days after the initial invasion and right at the moment Bush was telling the world of an impending invasion of Saudi Arabia – show light sand drifts over patches of roads leading from Kuwait City to the Saudi border.

The photos taken on September 11, 1990, show exactly the same sand drifts but now larger and deeper, suggesting that they had built up naturally without the disturbance of traffic for a month. Roads in northern Saudi Arabia during this same period, in contrast, show no sand drifts at all, having been swept clean by heavy traffic of supply convoys.

September 1990.

You want to research the Iraq war against Iran.

Basic Questions.

What time did they attack.

What tactics were used for infantry and artillery.

There was none.

In all the intel community.

Gaps still exist today.

We have nothing like the analysis that exists for the American Civil War.

A few interviews with survivors of the war could piece together a battle picture like they did for the Battle of the Somme in WWI.

 

 

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